As predicted, blogging platform Posterous is shutting down

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We saw it coming, and now it is happening: Posterous, one of the first mini-/fast-blogging tools of the past years, is closing its doors on April 30. At the end of October we described how there were an increasing number of signs that suggested an upcoming shutdown. Half a year earlier Twitter announced the acquisition of Posterous. Already back then many observers saw this as a talent acquisition rather as a product or platform acquisition. With the official announcement on the Posterous blog that the team will focus 100 percent on its efforts at Twitter, this theory turns out to be true.

Even though Posterous was quite unstable and full of bugs back in October, the service didn’t provide its users with a proper backup tool. Fortunately, that has changed. All remaining Posterous users can go to https://posterous.com/#backup to access a .zip-File with all blog posts and comments. For everybody who plans to transfer their blog to WordPress, WordPress offers an internal Posterous importer. In our October post we explained how to use it in order to move all Posterous content to a WordPress blog.

The demise of Posterous does not say anything about the state of blogging. Tumblr, which launched during the same time as Posterous managed to grow exponentially and is going strong even today whereas Posterous never left its early adopter niche. An while Posterous will be history soon, a couple of new contenders such as Quora, Svtble, Medium and even LinkedIn have entered the blogging space in various ways.

Posterous lost because it couldn’t keep up with the competition. It’s probably better that Twitter finally pulls the switch instead of keeping it online while at the same time completely neglecting it.

How to move your content from Posterous to WordPress

There was a time when Posterous and Tumblr were the two cool kids on the evolving mini-blogging scene. But while Tumblr despite many down-times grew exponentially, Posterous somehow didn’t manage to follow the same path. Then in March this year, Twitter announced the acquisition of Posterous. According to media reports, Twitter was mainly interested in the Posterous team, leaving users wondering whether the blogging service does have a future.

It’s not unlikely to assume that Posterous won’t exist forever, also judging from bugs and issues that have been plaguing Posterous users during the recent month and that are not properly being fixed. Recently, Posterous founder Sachin Agarwal said that the team is working on a new exporting tool which would be the best solution to export content out of Posterous. Since Posterous feels rather abandoned nowadays, there seems to be only one reasonable explanation for why the team develops a new exporting tool: in order to be able to close down the platform.

For those of you who are still using Posterous and who don’t want to wait until the last second, there is already now a great way of moving away from Posterous: Exporting your content to a WordPress blog, the world’s leading blogging platform.

It’s a very simple process. Here is how you do it:

For hosted blogs on WordPress.com

If you don’t want to host your own WordPress blog, the free or paid service on WordPress.com is a good alternative. After you have created your blog, log into the admin panel and click on “tools” in the left navigation bar. In the popup layer, click on “import”. Choose “Posterous” from the list of available services, enter the URL of your Posterous blog, the email address you used for registering with Posterous and your Posterous password, and press “Submit”. That’s all, now just wait until your content has fully been pulled out of Posterous.

For self-hosted WordPress blogs

If you decide to host your own WordPress blog with the free software from WordPress.org, you need ot install the Posterous importer plugin before you can move your content form Posterous to your WordPress blog. In the WordPress admin panel, click on “Plugins” in the left navigation bar, “Add new”, and search for “Posterous”. Choose the “Posterous Importer” from the list of search results and press “Install now”. After that is done, click on “tools” in the left navigation bar. In the popup layer, click on “import”. Choose “Posterous” from the list of available services, enter the URL of your Posterous blog, the email address you used for registering with Posterous and your Posterous password, and press “Submit”. That’s all, now just wait until your content has fully been pulled out of Posterous.