Medienbewachen.de close to listing 100 Social Media Monitoring Tools

(Zur deutschen Version dieses Artikels geht’s hier)

Medienbewachen.de

November last year we launched Medienbewachen.de, a Wiki in German for everyone looking for social media monitoring tools focusing on the German-speaking market. On the Wiki you’ll find dozens of tools that can help you monitoring and analysing the buzz on the web. Many services listed offer a detailed presentation introducing their core features, pricing and contact details. Medienbewachen.de shall make it easy for everyone to find the tool suiting their individual needs best.

Since its launch, the Wiki has grown – it now lists 76 social media monitoring tools of which 38 offer a detailed presentations plus another 38 where a presentation will be added in the future. Every week we get in new requests regarding the Wiki and we are really happy to see that Medienbewachen.de also clearly helps with generating new leads and giving additional reach to the social media monitoring services taking part.

According to Stefan Vetter, Head of Marketing at MeMo News AG Switzerland, Medienbewachen.de has become the fifth biggest traffic source for MeMo News. He praises the Wiki for being an excellent platform where everyone looking for  social media monitoring tools can gain a good first overview. Such a platform  has been missing before, he said.

Echobot, based in Karlsruhe, Germany uses Medienbewachen.de actively as part of its marketing strategy. Tobias Görgen, Managing Director of Toocan, thinks that being part of the Wiki means increased traffic and visibility for monitoring tools. We made an interview with Tobias last year, you can read it here.

Google Analytics shows that during the last month 75 percent of all visitors came to Medienbewachen.de for the first time, while 25 percent were returning to the site. This means that people started actively using it as a resource for their research of social media monitoring tools, but also that a lot of new people find to the site. A good balance!

We look forward to developing Medienbewachen.de further and would love to see your tool listed as well, so you offer a social media monitoring tool aimed at the German market. Get in touch and we get you started!

Medienbewachen.de listet bald 100 Social Media Monitoring Tools

(The English version of this article is available here)

Medienbewachen.de

Im November vergangenen Jahres haben wir mit Medienbewachen.de ein Angebot für alle gestartet, die nach Social-Media-Monitoring-Werkzeugen speziell für den deutschsprachigen Raum suchen. Auf dem Wiki findet ihr eine umfangreiche Übersicht zu Werkzeugen für die Beobachtung und Analyse von Sozialen Medien – viele davon mit einer detaillierten Präsentation. Ziel ist es, allen, die auf der Suche nach einem Social Media Monitoring Tool sind, bei der Auswahl zu helfen.

Die Site hat sich in den vergangenen viereinhalb Monaten sehr gut entwickelt. Mittlerweile sind 76 Social Media Monitoring Tools vertreten, davon  38 Tools mit oftmals detaillierten Präsentationen, sowie 38 weitere die noch eine Präsentation hinterlegen werden. Wöchentlich erreichen uns Anfragen, und Medienbewachen.de hilft ganz offensichtlich den gelisteten Unternehmen dabei potentielle neue Kunden zu erreichen und ihre Sichtbarkeit zu verbessern.

Stefan Vetter, Head of Marketing bei der MeMo News AG Schweiz, ließ uns wissen, dass Medienbewachen.de mittlerweile  Platz 5 der Besucherquellen für MeMo News einnimmt. Sein Urteil: “Ich halte Medienbewachen für ein sehr gutes Angebot, um einen Überblick über Anbieter von Social Media Monitoring und Analytics im deutschsprachigen Raum zu bekommen – das hat zuvor einfach gefehlt.”

Echobot.de, ein junger deutscher Anbieter aus Karlsruhe, nutzt Medienbewachen.de aktiv als Teil seiner Marketingstrategie. Tobias Görgen, Managing Director von Toocan, geht davon aus, dass Medienbewachen.de vielen Anbietern zusätzlichen Traffic und damit zusätzliche Reichweite bringt. Mit Tobias haben wir übrigens im vergangenen Jahr ein Interview geführt.

Ein Blick auf Google-Analytics zeigt, dass im letzten Monat 75 Prozent aller Besucher auf Medienbewachen.de die Site zum ersten Mal besuchen, 25 Prozent sind wiederkehrende Nutzer. Das deutet daraufhin, dass bereits rund ein Viertel der Besucher das Angebot aktiv für seine Recherchen nutzt, während gleichzeitig sehr viele neue Besucher zu Medienbewachen.de finden. Ein gutes Verhältnis, wie wir finden, und nun gilt es Medienbewachen.de weiter auszubauen.

Fehlt noch ein Anbieter mit Fokus auf den deutschsprachigen Raum, oder wollt ihr euer Tool vorstellen? Dann meldet euch!

“The way we share and what kind of content we share will evolve”

The more content people publish on social media sites and blogs, the more important it is for companies, brands and organisations to monitor what’s being said about them on the web. There is a huge number of Social Media Monitoring services to choose from. Many are using Twingly data about the blogosphere, such as Sweden-based Lissly. We had a chat with Simon Sundén, one of Lissly’s co-founders, about what’s happening at Lissly, what’s to expect in the upcoming month and where he thinks social media is heading.

Please give us a quick introduction of Lissly. What’s the company background and what kind of services are you offering?
Lissly is a social media monitoring tool which you can use to monitor what’s being said on social media any keyword or phrase. We launched our tool in October 2010 and are based in Sweden. Lissly focuses on providing the best monitoring for local markets and languages, which often isn’t that easy with other tools and services. We worked hard to have the best data for Sweden and now we are expanding to other countries & languages in Northern Europe.

What are the main differentiation points of Lissly compared to other Social Media monitoring solutions?
We know the local market and offer monitoring for local languages, especially in Northern Europe. Lissly is also a very easy to use, we like to call it “Social Media Analytics for the People”. But of course you can always go in-depth and get detailed data.

Is there any feature that in your eyes is especially good or useful, that you want to highlight?
Of course everything in Lissly is awesome, but our Forum Monitoring as well as Related Words are some key features I personally like a lot! Currently we monitor a majority of all forum activity in Sweden, including the largest forums in Sweden as a total as well as within each niche. Related Words is a feature where you directly can see what related words & topics are connected to your keyword or project.

What is on the roadmap for the upcoming 12 month? Where is Lissly heading?
We strive to have the best quality on every single language in the Nordic region (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish) and plan to expand to other markets & languages. That also means that we will add a lot of new sources. Every language and country has its own important blogs, forums, social networks – we will allow monitoring of all of them. Other upcoming improvements include an iPhone app that we plan to release in autumn, enhancements to our API, features to show more information regarding each mention (retweets, shares, likes, views, ratings etc.) to better understand the social impact and better functions for bookmarks, notifications and mail reports.

You are using Twingly’s API to collect data from the blogosphere, so you have a rather good insight into the world of blogs ; ) What are your thoughts on evolution and future of blogs?
Yes, Twingly’s API is one of the sources we use to gather blogosphere data and we really like it. Concerning blogs: They have “survived” many years and I’m absolutely positive that they will continue to be an important part of the social web in the future. What will evolve is the way we share and what kind of information we share – with better mobile connectivity and easier services like Tumblr we will see a lot more of picture, video and other media type sharing than plain text. Much of the blogging today doesn’t happen on what we typically call a “blog platform” like WordPress, Typepad or Blogger but rather on video sites, sharing sites etc. We see a lot of video blogs on YouTube, picture blogging, sharing on Tumblr and so on – this is also blogging and I think that this will increase in the future.

Where do you see social media in 2-3 years?
In 2-3 years we will not talk about social media anymore but rather the social web. It’s already becoming harder and harder to find sites on the web that aren’t social. I have a feeling that we are moving towards a web where we increasingly will be dependent on our social identity. This will be the basic platform where all our social activities are tied together – you will use it to comment on sites, register for forums, play games and so on. We already see this today with services like Facebook and Google, but as more sites implement social functionality the amount of information connected to our social identity will grow.

8 reasons why Sweden is a great country for web startups

Have you ever wondered why there are so many Internet startups with roots in Sweden – a country with a rather small population (only 9 million)? For being relatively few people, the country in the north of Europe has been giving birth to a huge number of online services and is home to a lot of innovation in the digital space. And yes, even Twingly has its base in Sweden.

In this post we’ll try to highlight a few of the factors that might have helped to make Sweden become a country that you need to count in when searching for potentially disruptive tech startups.

Global approach from day one due to small population
Many Swedish web services in the consumer business target an international audience from day one. The Swedish market is often simply to small for big ambitions.

Cluster due to a centralized state
Sweden has only three big cities with more than 100.000 inhabitants: Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö. That means that a relatively huge part of the daily business and innovation process takes place in those three cities, with the greater Stockholm area – where almost 20 percent of the Swedes live – being the center and a cluster for IT and technology companies, business angels, VCs and talents. Clusters usually have a positive impact on the quantity of companies founded (as the Silicon Valley has proved).

Sweden, country of inventors and entrepreneurs
Inventing things that help to improve the quality of life has always been an area Swedes have put an effort on. That led to a bunch of globally well known Swedish companies such as Ericsson, IKEA, Volvo or Tetra Pak. Inventing things and creating businesses based on those inventions gives you a high social status in the Swedish society, thus it is not a surprise that launching a startup is not the least prioritized option for young (and old) Swedes.

A nation embracing IT
Like other Nordic countries, in Sweden IT is mainly being seen as something positive that can make people’s life better, and you find this insight in most levels of society. For instance, 6 out of 10 companies in Scandinavia have at least one technical person in the management team. That’s 10 percent more than the worldwide average (source, translated). Naturally that mindset has a positive impact on the number of IT and Internet startups being founded.

Good infrastructure
Internet in Sweden is pretty ubiquitous, affordable, and the average speed for both down- and upload is good (and one of the highest in the world).

Availability of Venture Capital
Even though the situation for Venture Capital in Sweden is far from perfect, the amount of Venture capital available in relation to the GDP is higher in Sweden than in the rest of Europe (source; translated).

High quality of life and open society
Sweden is one of the countries with the highest quality of life. Add that to the fact that most Swedes are skilled English speakers and it gets obvious that even though it can be pretty cold in the winter, it’s not too difficult to attract talent to move to Sweden. And that sooner or later benefits any Swedish startup and company expanding and needing more people.

Swedes pick up trends quickly
Many Swedes are paying a lot of attention to trends, which can be picked up extremely quickly. The same goes for new markets and technology. As soon as some new concept, idea or business case appears, it won’t take long until someone wants to try to built something with that, instead of thinking too long about the possible risks.

There are probably many more aspects. Feel free to add your thoughts in the comments. And we don’t deny that Sweden has its challenges as well. Not everything is perfect, and there are exceptions to every rule. But simply judging from the quantity (and quality) of the Swedish entrepreneurial outcome, it seems as if the climate for starting your own Internet company seems to be pretty good here in the north.

We love Data and we attend #NEXT11 in Berlin!

Anton and I will have the great honour to be part of a group of almost 80 official bloggers from all over Europe and we will be helping covering NEXT Conference with blog posts and tweets.

We already started our personal blogging, Anton’s posts you find here and mine here. And we do not mind you following our updates on Twitter at all….

We look forward to a great program and listening to a whole bunch of awesome speakers. Peter Vesterbacka from Rovio, creators of Angry Birds, Mike Butcher from Techcrunch Europe, Amanda Rose of Twestival, David Rowan from Wired UK and Markus “Videopunk” Hündgen from Blinkenlichten and one of the organisers of VideoCamp only being a few of the many highlights.

Last but certainly not least it will be exciting to follow who wins the Elevator Pitch! The Jury already chose the 12 finalists, and I already chose my 3 favourites , and I think Anton cannot decide really… 😉 . Am excited to see how they all will be doing!

Since it is two Twinglians taking part in the blog- and tweet-buzz  around NEXT, we of course didn’t miss setting up a Liveboard  already some time ago.

Check it out on your iPad, Safari, Chrome or (good news!) now even on IE9+ and FF4.0+ !

Already over 2000 tweets! Let’s see if we get #next11 as trending topic onto Twitter during next Tuesday and Wednesday – would be nice!

By the way should you be one of the people who decide last minute to attend the conference there are still a few tickets available – with 30% discount!

Now you know where to find us – and we’d love to meet you there!

A handy list of major tech and social media events in Europe

Flickr/LeWEB10, CC licence BY 2.0

The Twingly team enjoys attending tech events and conferences across Europe. Meeting hundreds of great people working with or being interested in the fields of social media, startups and digital culture is the best way to get inspiration, to learn, to collect feedback and to simply have lots of fun.

For our own purpose as well as for you we compiled a list of major startup, tech and social media conferences/events that we either usually travel to, feel that we should attend (but haven’t) or where we know other’s who are enthusiastic about it.

That means this list is probably far from complete (and there might be a slight emphasis on the Nordics). In case you want to recommend an annual major event with focus on the topics mentioned that takes place anywhere in Europe feel free to let us know in the comments.

Please note that some of the events on this list have already taken place for 2011 or won’t happen this year at all. But we figured that this overview could come handy even next year, and those events pausing 2011 might have a huge comeback in 2012.

January
DLD Conference
January, Munich, Germany
Website

February
Lift
Geneva, Switzerland
Website

March
GeeknRolla
London, UK
Website 

Plugg
Brussels, Belgium
Website

Social Media World Forum Europe
London, UK
Website

April
re:publica
Berlin, Germany
Website

SHiFT
Lisbon, Portugal
Website

SIME
Vienna, Austria
Website

The Next Web
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Website

May
GeekGirlMeetup
Stockholm, Sweden
Website (only in Swedish)

Next Conference
Berlin, Germany
Website

SIME
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Website

June
reboot
Copenhagen, Denmark
Website

SIME
Barcelona, Spain
Website

July
TEDGlobal
Edinburgh, Scotland
Website

August
Media Evolution – The Conference
Malmö, Sweden
Website

Sweden Social Web Camp
Tjärö, Sweden
Website (only in Swedish)

September
Arctic15
Helsinki, Finland
Website

PICNIC
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Website

The European Pirate Summit
Cologne, Germany
Website

October
Future of Web Apps Conference
London, UK
Website

SIME
Helsinki, Finland
Website

November
NOAH
London, UK
Website

SIME
Stockholm, Sweden
Website

The TechCrunch Europas
London, UK
(no official event website, coverage on http://eu.techcrunch.com)

December
LeWeb
Paris, France
Website

You can find additional information about most of those events on Lanyrd.

“For Lindex, fashion blogs are as important as traditional media”

Back in May 2008 we could welcome our first e-commerce partner which decided to implement the Twingly Blogstream solution: Lindex, one of Sweden’s most well known fashion chains. Almost 3 years ago social media hasn’t been as ubiquitous as it is now, so taking this step and connecting an online store with the blogosphere deserved a lot of respect. Now of course, things have changed, and a host of other online shops and e-commerce sites use Twingly. That makes Lindex a real early adopter. Anders Dahlberg holds the position of Director of E-commerce at Lindex and was the one making the Twingly integration possible:

Hi Anders. Do you remember how you got in touch with Twingly?
I think it was an article on TechCrunch which made me aware of your service. They wrote about a solution for news sites but I figured that this would even work for an e-commerce platform. That’s why I called you, and after some exchange we implemented the Twingly Blogstream widget which we are still using today.

How exactly did you embed the widget?
We have it on each product site. If a blog links to a product page we automatically link back to the blog through Twingly. By doing that our visitors receive additional information regarding our products, and we send traffic to those linking to us.

What are your thoughts on the current state of social media?
Well, I think it’s getting harder for small blogs to be visible, while the bigger blogs maintain their reach. Those who only want to inform their closer friends might quit blogging and “move” their thoughts over to Facebook. Facebook is getting more important each and every day. Just look at the new comment system for third party sites which is pretty exciting, since it might help to increase incoming traffic from Facebook to external sites, like blogs.

How important are fashion blogs for Lindex? How do they impact sales?
Fashion blogs are as important as the traditional media. We work with them in the same way as e.g. with magazines – we invite bloggers to press events, maintain a dialog in our showroom and help out with answers and questions.

Which upcoming e-commerce trends do you see?
From a Swedish point of view expansion into foreign European markets will be one main theme for the near future, in order to reach new customers. Apart from that an overall trend is to become more effective in working with existing clients through service and inspiration. It’s very powerful if your existing customers are happy with your store and tell their friends about it.

What’s Lindex vision for the online store?
At Lindex everything is about fashion and inspiration. We want to inspire people to live a beautiful and happy life. We aim at making people curious with our commercials, which lead them to our site. They decide to buy something either online or in one of our physical stores in order to to feel beautiful and happy and to tell their friends about it. Having a successful multi-channel strategy in place is important, which is why our site has a high priority for getting in touch with our customers.

Reloaded: Europe’s 50 most popular startups according to the blogosphere

Photo (CC): Tomas Fano

In the beginning of August last year we published a ranking of Europe’s 50 most popular startups according to the blogosphere. We took this list from the TechCrunch Europe Top 100 index and analysed the buzz these startups were able to create within the global blogosphere based on Twingly blogsearch data.

About half a year later it’s time to for an updated version of our ranking. This time we focused on the time frame between November 20 2010 and February 20 2011. We also updated our list of European startups that were included in our analysis (and removed a few former startups that have recently been acquired).

So here we go again: Twingly presents Europe’s 50 most popular startups according to the blogosphere (with the last ranking’s position in brackets):

01 Spotify (1)
02 Dailymotion (3)
03 Miniclip (16)
04 SoundCloud (5)
05 Tuenti (4)
06 TweetDeck (6)
07 DailyBooth (11)
08 Shazam (10)
09 Netvibes (7)
10 Twingly (8)
11 fring (9)
12 Netlog (19)
13 Stardoll (2)
14 Trigami (17)
15 Jolicloud (42)
16 Tweetmeme (12)
17 Nimbuzz (14)
18 Prezi (-)
19 eBuddy (13)
20 Qype (20)
21 Deezer (22)
22 Jimdo (15)
23 Bambuser (27)
24 Zemanta (33)
25 ShoZu (24)
26 Skyscanner (41)
27 Wonga (37)
28 Swoopo (35)
29 sevenload (23)
30 eRepublik (34)
31 Plastic Logic (31)
32 zanox (26)
33 Fon (43)
34 Layar (21)
35 Voddler (18)
36 Vente-Privee.com (29)
37 We7 (50)
38 Trovit (25)
39 Twenga (46)
40 Zoopla (-)
41 simfy (-)
42 Rebtel (41)
43 Zopa (39)
44 Songkick (-)
45 Huddle.net (-)
46 FigLeaves (30)
47 Doodle (40)
48 Modu (44)
49 Wooga (-)
50 MyHeritage (28)

Notes
Being able to make users and journalists blog about a web startup does not necessarily mean that its products or services are good. Furthermore, consumer oriented web tools and blog centric services usually get more coverage on blogs than business-to-business companies, which is why the list is dominated by these kind of apps. Having said this, publicity is a requirement for succeeding as a tech startup, so the startups in this list seem to be on track regarding user awareness!

In some cases the search results were interfered by Spam and pure SEO postings or articles mentioning the same word, meaning something else. We then had to remove a part of the findings, which led to a lower ranking. When you study the list keep in mind that this is not the one and only, definite ranking, and there might be some startups missing. But it for sure gives you some useful insights into which services are being discussed the most in blogs all over the world.

If your Europe based startup is getting a lot of buzz and is missing in the ranking, or if you know a service that could be popular enough to appear on this list, please let us know in the comments, so that we can include it next time!

Final Voting on for German Social Media Award!

Only two days are left – today and tomorrow – so vote for your favourite project! These are the candidates in the second and final round:

Gute Sache (Good Cause):

Kunst (Art):

Gesellschaft (Society):

Medien (Media):

Wirtschaft (Business/ Economy):

Voting is easy. Go to one of the links above and read what the project is about. If you like it, click the button right under the title. Note – you have one vote per category and per day! Which is great, we think, cos we have real trouble deciding between all these cool sites. So we simply vote on different days if we really like more than one project in the same category. If you haven’t done so, start voting now! You’ve got only today and tomorrow…

The winners will be announced on the 10th of November at 6 pm on the Convention Camp in Hanover!

Like you, we are very curious to learn who won the race in the different categories. But what we know for sure is that there will be a nice little Twingly surprise for each winner. Provided that the snail mail does not decide to cross our plans…

You did not really get what this is all about? Then check out our post from a few weeks ago.

German Social Media Award – FTW!!

As some of you already might have seen we are one of the proud sponsors of the German Social Media Award hosted by Twittwoch.

And some of you might think “What the heck is “Twittwoch”?”. Well, here comes a quick round-up. Twittwoch is a German non-profit organisation that arranges regular Social Media Come-Togethers and Workshops. These give (business) people an opportunity to exchange ideas about social media face to face.

The name “Twittwoch” derives from “Twitter” and “Mittwoch”, German for “Wednesday”, and so the most  regular event still is the Twittwoch-night which happens once a month across several cities in Germany like i.e. München, Berlin, Frankfurt, Stuttgart, Essen and Hannover. Just that the topic is not anymore exploring the new opportunities of Twitter, instead it is an exchange about all kinds of social media topics.

Twittwoch thought it is about time that all the nice small social media initiatives get appreciated, the ones that often get run by one or only a few people, with lots of enthusiasm but often with little or no financial support.

Until the 1st of October you can suggest new candidates – please note that only projects in German language can enter the competition!

You might already have discovered that here are different categories you can vote in, and of course you can vote for all of them if you wanted to.

And that you really should do – VOTE!

Each project needs 250 Facebook-Likes to get into the second round – until the 15th of October. All projects with 250 Likes will enter the second voting round. For details, please take a look at the rules here.

The lucky winners will be presented on the 10th of November at the ConventionCamp Hannover, which is an annual conference where all kinds of people from economy, research and web 2.0 together come together for knowledge exchange and discussion.

Again, now it is your turn to vote! You do not have to be German to do that, but obviously you need some German to find your way around the site…

Will  “Wir für Frank”, “Tiny Tales” and “Manomama” lead all the way through to the final? Or will your vote or project suggestion change the game completely?

Your choice. Everything is still possible.