A handy list of major tech and social media events in Europe

Flickr/LeWEB10, CC licence BY 2.0

The Twingly team enjoys attending tech events and conferences across Europe. Meeting hundreds of great people working with or being interested in the fields of social media, startups and digital culture is the best way to get inspiration, to learn, to collect feedback and to simply have lots of fun.

For our own purpose as well as for you we compiled a list of major startup, tech and social media conferences/events that we either usually travel to, feel that we should attend (but haven’t) or where we know other’s who are enthusiastic about it.

That means this list is probably far from complete (and there might be a slight emphasis on the Nordics). In case you want to recommend an annual major event with focus on the topics mentioned that takes place anywhere in Europe feel free to let us know in the comments.

Please note that some of the events on this list have already taken place for 2011 or won’t happen this year at all. But we figured that this overview could come handy even next year, and those events pausing 2011 might have a huge comeback in 2012.

January
DLD Conference
January, Munich, Germany
Website

February
Lift
Geneva, Switzerland
Website

March
GeeknRolla
London, UK
Website 

Plugg
Brussels, Belgium
Website

Social Media World Forum Europe
London, UK
Website

April
re:publica
Berlin, Germany
Website

SHiFT
Lisbon, Portugal
Website

SIME
Vienna, Austria
Website

The Next Web
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Website

May
GeekGirlMeetup
Stockholm, Sweden
Website (only in Swedish)

Next Conference
Berlin, Germany
Website

SIME
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Website

June
reboot
Copenhagen, Denmark
Website

SIME
Barcelona, Spain
Website

July
TEDGlobal
Edinburgh, Scotland
Website

August
Media Evolution – The Conference
Malmö, Sweden
Website

Sweden Social Web Camp
Tjärö, Sweden
Website (only in Swedish)

September
Arctic15
Helsinki, Finland
Website

PICNIC
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Website

The European Pirate Summit
Cologne, Germany
Website

October
Future of Web Apps Conference
London, UK
Website

SIME
Helsinki, Finland
Website

November
NOAH
London, UK
Website

SIME
Stockholm, Sweden
Website

The TechCrunch Europas
London, UK
(no official event website, coverage on http://eu.techcrunch.com)

December
LeWeb
Paris, France
Website

You can find additional information about most of those events on Lanyrd.

How to get your blog linked by major websites with Twingly

If you have been following our recent articles you may have noticed that there is a huge number of websites that uses our Twingly Blogstream widget in order to show blogs that linked to them (here is the full list of partners). The great thing for bloggers: They get an incoming link from a major website which can drive a lot of traffic.

If you are a blogger you might be wondering what you have to do in order to show up on our partner’s websites. In this post we provide you with a step-by-step tutorial for that very purpose.

1. Write a blog post and link to a Twingly partner
You write a blog post containing a link to our partner’s website that’s related to your blog post. It’s important that you link to the address or page where the Twingly widget is located, which most is on specific article/product pages.

2. Ping Twingly
You ping us. That means that you notify us that you published a blog post linking to one of our partners, which we need to know for pushing the link to your article to our partner’s website. Some blog platforms have a setting that allows for automatic pinging every time you have written a new post, for example if you host your own WordPress blog (note: Blogs hosted at WordPress.com do not include this feature). In this case simply add http://rpc.twingly.com/ to your blog tool’s list of ping services.

Ping Twingly from a self-hosted WordPress blog

If your blogging platform of choice doesn’t support automatic pinging, you can notify us manually about your posting containing the link to a partner website. Go to this site and enter the address of your blog or the URL to your RSS feed.

Two things to remember: We index your RSS feed. If you only publish the first parts of your posting via RSS we might not see your links to our partner websites and your blog won’t show up in their Twingly Blogstream widget. So make sure to publish your complete articles as RSS. If necessary, you can change this in your blogging platform’s settings section.

Furthermore, sometimes it takes a while between you publishing a post and your site appearing in the partner’s Twingly widget. So please be patient, it can take up to 1- 15 minutes.

3. Your blog appears on our partner’s website
Our server notices the link from your blog to a Twingly partner and highlights your blog in the partner’s widget (which usually is located somewhere on our partner’s article/product pages).

Incoming links from blogs on adlibris.com
Incoming links from blogs on adlibris.com

4. Hurray! You get a lot of visitors from major websites

Good to know: People can and may report spam or abuse which moderators at the partner site could check out. If they come to the conclusion that it’s spam or something similar they ban the post. They can also ban the whole blog. So behave! =)

“The most exciting shift right now actually happens within children’s literature.”

Just a few days ago we announced that the two largest online booksellers in Sweden, Adlibris and Bokus, have launched Twingly Blogstream on their sites to show blog links. But another renowned company within the Swedish book industry made such a step already two year’s ago: Norstedts, Sweden’s oldest publishing house founded in 1823. The company runs both norstedts.se as well as rabensjogren.se (the country’s leading publisher of children’s books) and is putting a lot of emphasis on integration with social media channels.

Norstedts recently relaunched its websites and now more than ever highlights incoming blog posts. We spoke to Klas Fjärstedt who is the one in charge of Norstedts’ and Rabén & Sjögren’s digital media about this move.

You recently relaunched your site and put blog reviews about your books into an even bigger spotlight. Tell us about the thoughts behind that decision.
The Swedish blogs dealing with books are usually of very high quality. Linking directly from our sites to those bloggers reviewing our books can be seen as a clear sign of how much we appreciate and value the “bookosphere”, which is gaining importance. We want bloggers to know that if they refer to one of our books they’ll be visible on our main homepage, regardless of what they write, regardless of whether they praise or criticize a book. We think this kind of openess and transparency is important. We don’t select manually which blog posts will be visible.

The book industry is driven by new content. Older books vanish quickly from the spotlight. The books on our homepage usually are the latest releases. However, bloggers write about both current and older publications. It’s fun to see some older release appear back on our homepage simply because someone blogged about it. Bloggers are kind of in controll about a part of our site, which I think is exciting.

I also want to emphasize that we have been using the Twingly integration since 2009. As far as I know there is no other book publisher yet that has done this ste, and it’s only now that online booksellers seem to wake up. I think there is a lot of inspiration to gain from visiting our sites, and we are proud to be cutting edge.

Any other improvements on your site you find especially noteworthy?
The key criteria for our relaunch was added value, simplicity and openess. Those attributes are the foundation for what we do on the web, and there is a lot Twingly can give us in order to accomplish our goals. We also reworked out design, everything looks much clearer now. On rabensjogren.se we built new templates in order to present the children’s books’ characters in a more vivid way, like here. On norstedts.se we have new templates to present book series, e.g. here.

What’s the impact of social media on the book business?
It’s huge. There is a lot of online conversation about books, and our goal is to participate in that. We want to make it as easy as possible to blog about our releases, to bring our content to other sites (by offering a HTML code for embedding book covers) and to share it via Facebook, Twitter and other social media channels. We know that a recommendation by a blogger for a book has a lot of impact on the purchase decision – often it has more weight and a higher conversion rate than advertising. Bloggers invest a lot of time to review our books and most of them are quite ambitious, thus there is a big benefit for our customers to read those postings.

Can you compare the “bookosphere” to the fashion blogosphere?
I’m under the impression that in Sweden books and fashion are the two most popular topics people blog about. They want to express their opinions and feelings about books!

These are exciting times, even books are going digital. What are your thougths on the future of books, and which ways do you see to bring the traditional book and the digital world together?
Fictional publications will move towards e-books. We already publish many of our releases digitally. Regarding children’s books we see an interesting trend towards applications, creating interactive versions of book content. The most exciting shift right now actually happens within children’s literature.

Do you personally read blogs? Which ones are your favourites?
Yes I do, and my main source for recommendations are the people I follow on Twitter. Twitter is a fantastic knowledge channel!

Here is Klas on Twitter.

Connecting the blogosphere to the bookosphere

Today we’re happy to announce that the two largest e-commerce sites for books here in Sweden, Adlibris and Bokus, have launched Twingly Blogstream on their sites to show blog links. Since Norstedts / Raben & Sjögren already are using Twingly on their sites as well, we can now proudly say that we have connected the blogosphere to the bookosphere.

Books is a huge topic in the blogosphere and both Bokus.com and Adlibris.com have already hundreds of blog links to their sites every month. From now on they’ll be shown on Bokus.com and Adlibris.com as “blog reviews” or “blog comments” on every product page. Check out the product pages for “Hundraåringen som klev ut genom fönstret och försvann” (Adlibris) and “De målade grottornas land” (Bokus) to see how it looks.

The Twingly widget makes together with comments, reviews and social networks like Twitter and Facebook the shopping on these sites to a social experience and not just a informative buying experience. Books are perfect social objects, they make people connect with each other. The e-commerce sites for books haven’t been that social before despite that books are one of the most classic examples of social objects but with Twingly and other types of social media these sites have finally created a social environment that the books deserve.

Happy (book)blogging!

Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/anna/5390386327/

Twingly and TV4+ Haunted House launches Blog Platform for Ghost Writers and Social Mediums

To allow ghosts and spirits to communicate more freely with the living, Twingly today launches a blog platform for the unrestful dead. The TV4+ show Haunted House is a partner in the project, providing the Social Mediums needed to launch the service.

Poltergeists and other spirits that can affect the physical realm via telekinesis or other means can log in themselves as long as they can push the keys of a keyboard. But these are not the majority of ghosts, according to market research. And ghosts of this kind could potentially use a common WordPress installation instead of a specialized blog platform for ghosts.

So what innovation have Twingly come up with to allow all spirits to use the blog platform, thereby reaching a broader market?

Twingly CEO Martin Källström explains:

“For ghosts that cannot take physical form we provide what we refer to as Social Mediums to write for them. The TV show Haunted House will make sure that social mediums are available at all times to take down their messages and publish them on their blogs.”

Social mediums have increased in popularity in recent years. A Google search for the phrase currently yields 108,000 results.

The ghastly blogs will also be made searchable on Twingly Blogsearch and will of course be automatically linked by partner sites using Twingly Blogstream.

Martin Källström concludes:

“We are looking forward to seeing the results from this project. Ghosts have insight far beyond our worldly realms. Combining this with the free speech of the blogosphere has a huge potential. This could be bigger than Wikileaks.

So what’s next for Twingly?

“Zombie bloggers! We are developing keyboards with huge keys that can be operated even by bloggers with very limited dexterity.”

Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/barb_ar/3056076295/